'We're confident' - fit-again Fornaroli fired up for derby

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No Melbourne City man has more derby goals than Bruno Fornaroli, and the Uruguayan hitman wants a fifth against Melbourne Victory on Saturday night.

Fornaroli's haul of four against Victory has the 31-year-old ahead of former Heart aces John Aloisi, Alex Terra and new Wellington Phoenix signing David Williams as the club's best derby marksman.

Yet for all of his exertions up front, Fornaroli has tasted success against Kevin Muscat's side just twice since arriving in Australia.

He's keen to notch a third win on Saturday night, which he says would be a terrific springboard for the new season.

"We are ready and we're confident and we will try to win the first game," he said.

"It's important for everyone. A derby and three points away will give great confidence."

Central to City's hopes could be the new spine of Socceroos midfielder-in-waiting Riley McGree and Fornaroli.

The Uruguayan will start up front at Marvel Stadium, with McGree likely to play as the playmaking number 10.

Fornaroli said he'd enjoyed linking up with the 19-year-old since his arrival from Newcastle Jets and hoped they could develop on-field chemistry.

"He's a big player. Physically and mentally, he's talented unbelievably," he said.

"The young players we've got, they're fantastic and hungry.

"We believe in Riley. We'll try to support him and for sure he'll become bigger and one day play for Australia."

Fornaroli has played in seven countries over a nomadic career.

He is keen to extend his stay in Australia into a fifth year but presently is out of contract at City at season's end.

'El Tuna' first tasted a derby atmosphere in his native Uruguay in 2011, playing for youth club Nacional against rivals Penarol in front of 55,000 people at the Estadio Centenario - the same Montevideo venue that saw Socceroos heartbreak on the road to the FIFA World Cup in 2001.

Fornaroli said he preferred the Australian derbies to those back home.

"It's not as intense as derbies there because fans are more intense in Uruguay," he said.

"Here, it's great to see people walk to the game, hand in hand, wearing different shirts. There, it's impossible.

"I'm happy to see my kids go there, my family go there and walk there. Back home I prefer them to watch on TV."

Source: AAP