Columnist

Tim Vickery

British-born Tim works as a journalist and has lived in Brazil since 1994 and provides unrivalled knowledge of South American football. Follow @Tim_Vickery on Twitter.

297blog entries
“We have to learn how to play both with and without Messi,” says Argentina coach Edgardo Bauza.
International football should be grateful that the first part of his phrase still applies. Lionel Messi, of course, announced his retirement from playing for Argentina after a penalty shoot out defeat to Chile in the final of the Copa Cent...
Europe’s main event is the UEFA Champions League, the competition where the top players from all over the world congregate, seeking to win the trophy and each other’s respect.
Strictly speaking, South America’s equivalent is the Copa Libertadores. But club football in the continent has been so gutted by player sales that a different comparison can be made. The closest that South America gets to the Champions Lea...
There were real grounds for concern when the final of the men’s Olympic football tournament went to penalties. How often do the Germans lose a shootout? Winning the gold medal was much more important for Brazil - they were in front of their own...
And they had been the better side over a gripping 120 minutes - the Germans had probably shaded it in terms of clear-cut chances, but Brazil had exerted control for most of the game. But now it all came down to a shootout, the ultimate ind...
Season 2016-2017 promises to be a fascinating campaign in the career of our old friend, Everton centre-back Ramiro Funes Mori.
A year ago, when the Argentine centre-back crossed the Atlantic, I said that I thought he would not be good enough for the Premier League. Happily, I was wrong – it is always nice to be wrong when players turn out to be better than expecte...
The World Cup is the child of the Olympic football tournament, but one is now the greatest sporting spectacle on earth while the other is struggling to remain relevant.
Follow @TheWorldGame It all began when Uruguay arrived unheralded for the Paris Games of 1924 – and proceeded to cruise to the gold medal, filling those who watched with enthusiasm for a new type of balletic football.  Four years later in ...
For the first time in 25 years, the final of the Copa Libertadores will not feature a team from Brazil or Argentina. Instead, Atletico Nacional of Colombia will contest the trophy over two legs with Ecuador's Independiente del Valle.
It may well be nothing more than co-incidence, but the last two times the title did not go to a representative from one of the big two countries, it went to Ecuador (LDU of Quito won in 2008) and Colombia (whose Once Caldas had been victo...
It appeared that, finally, the stars had aligned and that arguably the greatest footballer of them all would claim a cherished trophy for his Argentina, but one wayward kick changed the course of history forever. But surely there is another...
Follow @TheWorldGame The first time in New York inevitably makes an impression. The band Prefab Sprout put that ‘wow factor’ to words and music a few years ago in their song ‘Hey Manhattan’. ‘Strolling Fifth Avenue,’ go the lyrics – ‘just ...
Eighty nine years ago ‘The Jazz Singer’ was in production, the Al Jolson vehicle that popularised ‘talkies’ – films with sound.
"Globally the effect was profound,” writes Bill Bryson in his wonderful ‘One Summer’ - an account of the many fascinating events that took place in the Unites States in the space of a few months in 1927.  "Moviegoers around the world sudd...
Early next week Chile, with a new coach and an ageing squad, will take on Argentina, who might be without Lionel Messi. Tim Vickery explains the hurdles both teams face as they attempt to win the 100th anniversary edition of the Copa America.
When Leicester City celebrated their recent Premier League triumph, was I the only one who could not help feeling a little sorry for them? This is not to belittle their extraordinary achievement. Quite the opposite. The problem is that th...
Why does one team beat another? Untangling the reasons for the outcome can be a fascinating business, because often three factors work together to form the final result; technical, psychological and plain old luck.
Take, for example, Sevilla’s 3-1 win over Liverpool in the recent final of the Europa League.  While they were in the first half ascendancy, Liverpool could have been awarded one, or even two penalties. To this extent, luck was against the...