• Ange Postecoglou has riled many people by his refusal to state his intentions (AAP)
COMMENT: What's wrong with Ange Postecoglou? The man continues to take us all for a ride and he appears to be loving every minute of it.
By
Philip Micallef

23 Oct 2017 - 9:52 PM  UPDATED 23 Oct 2017 - 10:45 PM

Four days after refusing to answer a question at a FFA function as to whether he will guide the Socceroos at the 2018 FIFA World Cup should they beat Honduras, Postecoglou took another step to antagonise many within the football fraternity in this country. 

The Socceroos coach was given an opportunity to tell us what are his post-Honduras intentions on the ABC program Australian Story

As the Socceroos face a do-or-die clash with the Central Americans the outcome of which could have serious ramifications on the game in Australia, Postecoglou accused those who rightfully demand answers of getting their priorities wrong. 

Socceroos won't be left in the lurch if Postecoglou leaves, Gallop insists
The Socceroos won't be left in the lurch if forced to head to the 2018 World Cup without Ange Postecoglou, Football Federation Australia boss David Gallop insists.
Postecoglou continues to evade questions on Socceroos future
Socceroos coach Ange Postecoglou has made it clear once again that he will not discuss his future in the job beyond the World Cup playoff against Honduras however many times he is asked.

The question put to him in a pre-recording in Melbourne on October 16 came in the last few moments of a blatant fluff piece comprising recycled material. It was simple and straight: “What are your intentions after the Honduras match?“ 

“Hopefully I’ll celebrate because if not my tenure ends,” Postecoglou said. 

It got worse. 

It was suggested to him that “if the Socceroos make it to the World Cup, you’ll be there … ” 

At which point Postecoglou shrugged his shoulders, paused, hesitated a little longer then said nothing. 

When asked to be more forthcoming he said smugly: “I’ve already answered that. People who are worried about my future should be worried about these two games but they are not. They just want an answer to a question and I’m not going to give them it.”

He also said his contract "ends whenever the World Cup journey ends" which is something we all knew but he would not tell us if he will honour it. 

Interestingly, earlier in the day Australian Story posted a segment on Twitter that included this quote: “People just want me to fit into their stereotype and answer in a way that makes them feel really good about themselves.” 

This is a poor attitude from a person who holds a position of trust and this is why he is wrong, even allowing for the fact that his relationship with Football Federation Australia is frosty at best and may have influenced his recent strange behaviour.

We do not know why Postecoglou appears to have gone cold on the Australian job but he owes it to everyone, not least his own players who need clarity and assurances, to shed some light on an issue that has polarised public opinion. 

Failing that, he could at least have the decency not to inflame a tenuous relationship with the media by appearing to be savouring his cocky ‘I’m-not-telling-you’ stance. 

He has even accused the media of being “lazy and ignorant” on another occasion. 

The fans who have stuck with the Socceroos through thick and thin have a right to know if Postecoglou will respect his contract or jump ship but not because they are interested in his career. 

Most people could not care any less whom Postecoglou coaches after he finishes up with Australia or where his future lies. All they are interested in is the fate of the Socceroos and if their coach will hang around should they prevail in the forthcoming play-off. 

Many fans in Australia suspect that Postecoglou’s mantra is all about him and his contribution to Australian Story did nothing to dispel a perception that is gathering momentum. 

Postecoglou’s apologists will no doubt jump to his defence and accuse those who are exercising their right to know what’s happening with our national team of negativity and obstructionism. 

What a load of rubbish. No journalist or commentator would have anything in mind other than the best interests of the national team. 

Postecoglou could do no wrong by anyone remotely interested in football after taking Brisbane Roar to two straight A-League titles and Australia to AFC Asian Cup glory. 

But he has tarnished his reputation by appearing to have fallen into the common trap of treating pundits with disdain. 

Many of Postecoglou’s current critics are the same pundits who backed him to the hilt not so long ago as he went about transforming the way we play our football. 

The coach may have raised a few eyebrows with some of his team selections and dubious choice of formations but most critics gave him the benefit of the doubt because they trusted him and were adhering to his plea to look at the bigger picture. I fell into that category. 

But there comes a point where you cannot defend the indefensible. Postecoglou appears to have lost the plot on and off the field and it is the media’s right and duty to point this out.